Is it Legal?

Yes! Selling food made in your home is legal, thanks to House Bill 0181

Passed in 2018, Utah decided to allow home cooks to make and sell food in their homes. No need for expensive licenses, hefty fees, or special kitchen equipment.

However in order to keep people safe, there are a few requirements . . .

Disclosure

It must be fully disclosed in writting (physically on the packaging, or online) that the food has not been inspected by the state, and was prepared under the Home Consumption and Homemade Food Act. ​ We take care of this step for you by displaying this information on the app to anyone who buys your food. If you want to take it a step further, you are welcome to print stickers and place them on your food packaging.

Allergens

All potential allergens must be fully disclosed in writing either on the packaging or online for the customer to purchase. ​ When you create a food listing on Local Chow, we require you to fill out all allergen information before the listing goes live. ​ Just like with the disclosure step, you are welcome to also list the allergens on the food packaging.

Ingredients

While you don't need to give out your grandma's secret recipe, it is required that you fully list all of the ingredients used in your food. ​ When you create a listing, there will be a special field for you to fill out an ingredient list in order to make sure you meet this requirement. ​ Just like with the previous steps, if you would like to also put an ingredients label on the food packaging itself, you are welcome to do so.

Two Restrictions

While you can make and sell almost anything out of your home, there are a couple of restrictions. 1) No selling unpasteurized milk or unpasteurized diary products (aka milk straight from the cow). This requires a special Utah permit 2) No selling meat from animals that you raised and slaughtered, or using that meat in your food, unless it is chicken or rabbit. Other meat is acceptable, but must be purchased from a grocery store and you must receive a license from your local health department (under new HB 94, the Microenterprise Home Kitchen Act) in order to use it in the food you sell.